Colorado’s Magnificent Clean Energy Potential–Xcel’s 2009 “RFP”

Submitted by Leslie Glustrom on May 9, 2010 – 2:13pm

In April 2009, Xcel Energy received the results of its “Request for Proposals,” or “RFP,” for filling future generation needs on its Colorado system. In the midst of a brutal economic crisis, Xcel received over 15,000 MW of clean energy bids–even though it had only sought about 1,000 MW. For reference, Xcel’s peak system demand with a 16% reserve margin is usually between 7,000 and 8,000 MW.

A Denver Business Journal article on the bids is here and a graph showing the bids is attached.

Of the bids received by Xcel, over 7,000 MW of wind and solar bids were proposed for development in the 2011 and 2012 time frame as indicated in Xcel’s May 2009 “30 Day Report” on the bids in the 07A-447E Docket at the Colorado Public Utilities Commission.

Xcel’s Analysis of the bids indicates that adding more renewable energy to the system as we head into a carbon-constrained world is likely to lower system costs, not raise them as shown in Figures 15 and 16 of Xcel’s August 2009 “120 Day Report” on the April 2009 bids.

Both the 30-Day Report and the 120 Day Report on the April 2009 RFP bids were prepared as part of Phase II of Xcel’s 2007 Resource Plan found in Docket 07A-447E at the Colorado PUC with full details available at https://www.dora.state.co.us/pls/efi/EFI.Show_Docket?p_session_id=&p_docket_id=07A-447E .

While replacing fossil fuel resources needs to happen in a considered fashion to ensure system reliability, it is clear that Colorado has magnificent renewable energy resources and an abundance of project developers ready to turn these resources into clean electricity.

As we unleash the entrepreneurial abilities of Colorado’s clean energy developers, we will also help to keep Colorado’s energy dollars in the state, creating jobs, tax revenues and multiplier effects.

Presently, well over $100 million leaves the State of Colorado annually to pay for coal deliveries from Wyoming. With abundant wind and solar in the state, it appears that the amount of money leaving the state to pay for coal could be significantly reduced.

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