Category Archives: CEA News

People’s Climate March on Denver: Get Involved Today

Tell our elected officials that the environment matters! April 29th, 2017 is the 100th day of President Donald Trump’s administration.  Clean Energy Action is marking the day by joining with the People’s Climate of Colorado and countless other groups in a huge demonstration to highlight our recognition that climate change is real, that it impacts all of us, and that we are committed to solving it.

The PCM in Denver, along with other sister city marches, is happening simultaneously to the People’s Climate March in Washington. Like the Women’s March, the PCM will be a national show of resistance, resolve, and unity.

There are many ways to show your support for our planet:

  • Planning to attend? RSVP on Facebook, sign up on Action Network,  and tell your friends and family.
  • Want to get more involved? Take this survey in order to register to be trained as an PCM Marshal, or check out these planning meetings in Denver and Boulder, and help us make sure the event is a great success!
  • The Climate March also needs financial support. Make a donation or purchase one of these awesome T-shirts, and put your dollars to work in defense of our environment.
  • You can also be a #climatehero and help spread the word on Facebook and twitter:  #peoplesclimatemarch #denverclimatemarch

Hope to see you there!

CEA Leads Coloradans in Challenging XCEL

The effort to decarbonize Colorado’s largest electricity supplier, Xcel Energy, advanced in Denver last month as Coloradans lined up to speak at the Colorado Public Utilities Commission hearing on Xcel’s 2016 Electric Resource Plan. Members of CEA led Coloradans from all walks of life in voicing their concerns about Colorado’s electricity future.

The hearing room at the Public Utilities Commission was overflowing as the people of Colorado addressed the three PUC Commissioners. They expressed a host of concerns about Xcel’s plan,  and asked for more focus on the abundance of cost-effective renewable energy available in Colorado, in accordance with Colorado’s laws and regulations.

The PUC is a part of the Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies, and is responsible for regulating many parts of our state’s utilities, transportation, and telecommunications.

 

Issues raised during the public testimony included the need to:

  • Consider climate change and the urgency of reducing carbon emissions
  • Increase the reliance on renewable energy in order to reduce both emissions and costs
  • Accelerate the adoption of storage technologies to support the integration of higher levels of renewable energy
  • Begin contingency planning in the event of future coal bankruptcies and potential coal supply constraints
  • Allow new, cleaner resources to replace energy generation from older, dirtier, more expensive fossil fuel resources

Citizen witnesses also discussed the need to analyze the choices between renewable energy (with no future fuel costs) and fossil fuel resources (with billions of dollars of future fuel costs) using lower discount rates. A lower discount rate will show increased savings from cost-effective renewable energy because future fuel costs won’t be so heavily discounted.

Discounting the approximately $60 billion in future fuel costs associated with Xcel’s Electric Resource Plan at Xcel’s Weighted Average Cost of Capital (“WACC”) will have the effect of shrinking these future fuel costs and also shrinking the savings that will come from cost-effective renewable energy resources like wind and solar that don’t have future fuel costs.

More details on Xcel’s Electric Resource Plan and the key issues, including the importance of the choice of discount rate, are available in the public comment filing made by Clean Energy Action Board member Leslie Glustrom.

CEA is grateful that the new appointees to the Colorado PUC , Chairperson Jeff Ackerman and Commissioner Wendy Moser, along with Commissioner Frances Koncilja, are dedicated to hearing from the public and that the public is well enough informed to provide useful and compelling testimony!

You can also check out Christi Turner’s comprehensive article in Boulder Weekly and learn more about this important step froward in the fight for cheaper, cleaner power.

Renewable Spring Sweeps Across Western U.S.

Quick Take: In a dramatic reversal of fortune for clean energy, utilities and state utility regulatory bodies have decided to remove barriers for wind and solar development while phasing out coal power.

PRESS RELEASE

April 1, 2016 – For Immediate Release

Contact:

Steven Winter, Clean Energy Action, 720-449-6763

Coal Swept Away in Winds of Change

In a dramatic reversal of fortune for clean energy, utilities and state utility regulatory bodies have decided to remove barriers for wind and solar development while phasing out coal power.

Across the West, major utilities are joining together in a pledge to phase out coal power plants by 2020. At a special meeting of the board of Colorado’s largest utility, resolutions were adopted to sign onto the pledge and invest in gigawatts of new wind and solar, with explicit commitments to share the solar market with independent installers.

“We’re not going to put good money after bad. Coal mines are playing out as company after company files for bankruptcy – the days of coal that can be mined at a profit are over,” said the president of the board of directors. “We’re proud of the great success we’ve had with investments in wind and solar – lowering emissions, saving ratepayers on their bills, and creating jobs.”

“Colorado has tremendous potential for new renewable energy so why be involved with dirty energy?” he continued. “Everyone’s got to do their part if we’re going to meet the Paris commitments. For us that means many gigawatts of new wind and solar – one gigawatt is certainly not enough. Besides, we can’t remain stuck behind Oklahoma in wind energy development and New Jersey in solar!”

Solar Spring Takes the West

While utilities pledged to take action, regulatory commissions in Western states moved to strike down net metering challenges as unfair, signaling their long-term support of the independent rooftop solar industry. Here in Colorado, caps on solar gardens will be removed as regulators reversed course, doing away with negative renewable energy credit pricing.

Southwestern states have retracted costly demand charges that have hindered solar installations in recognition of the benefits of deferred infrastructure investments and free fuel from the sun.

“When you take a hard look at the numbers, it’s clear that solar provides net benefits to both our climate and our ratepayers,” said one regulator. “With batteries and electric vehicles, a completely renewable electric grid is well within our reach.”

We are sorry to do this, but we must remind readers of the date stamp on this press release. Please stay tuned as we expect life to soon begin mimicking “art”!

CEA Releases Annual Report, Celebrates a Decade of Speaking Truth to Power

The end of 2015 represents an important milestone for Clean Energy Action. Founded in 2005 to oppose the construction of Colorado’s last coal-fired power plant, Comanche 3, we are proud of the organization that has evolved over a decade of powerful action and catalytic research on behalf of our climate.

As we celebrate a decade of speaking truth to power, this report focuses on CEA’s most significant achievements with an emphasis on the last two years.

View the Report Now

Even as we pause to reflect on these accomplishments, we cannot ignore the growing urgency of the climate crisis nor can we forget the widespread damage our changing climate has already inflicted.

While we have been able to accomplish a great deal with very little thus far, even greater change is needed. We need to continue to grow our revenue and expand our appeal in order to hire new staff, deepen our research and multiply our impact. We look to you for continued and generous support – together we can accelerate the pace of change in this next, most pivotal decade.

View the Report Here

Colorado Coalition for a Livable Climate Reaction to the 2015 Colorado Climate Action Plan

Fort Collins, CO – Member organizations of the Colorado Coalition for a Livable Climate (CCLC) were disappointed to learn that the 2015 Colorado Climate Plan, which was released today by the Hickenlooper Administration, makes only cursory reference to the greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals established by the Ritter Administration.  The Plan does not acknowledge that the State is currently falling far short of achieving those goals.

The CCLC is also concerned that the goals adopted by the Ritter Administration – which have seemingly been abandoned by the Hickenlooper Administration – are inadequate to meet the responsibility of our State to help avert catastrophic global climate change.  Given the widespread agreement among climate scientists that a global temperature rise of more than 1.5° to 2.0° C (2.7° to 3.6° F) over the mid-19th Century average would lead to a climate catastrophe, the CCLC proposes that the State of Colorado adopt the following new climate goal statement:

“To help secure a future in which the environment, culture, and economy of Colorado are not further irrevocably damaged by climate change, the State shall develop and adopt annual greenhouse gas emissions goals that are supportive of limiting the global average temperature rise to 1.5° C (2.7° F) or less by the end of this century, and which shall include achievement of carbon neutrality by 2030.  These goals shall be informed by the best available science, as well as by the need for an equitable allocation of our remaining carbon budget among all the people of the planet.  Building on past efforts, the State shall also develop and adopt a comprehensive, multi-sector plan to achieve the new goals, in addition to accounting measures to validate annual progress toward them.”

Due to the urgency of addressing global climate change, we must do far more than is contemplated by the recently released 2015 Colorado Climate Plan. Adoption of the above goal statement, followed by the creation of a plan for developing, achieving, and monitoring progress toward reaching the annual goals called for, is essential if Colorado is to assume a leadership role in responding to the climate crisis.

Member organizations of the CCLC include:

1.       350 Colorado

2.       Clean Energy Action

3.       Colorado Chapter, Global Catholic Climate Movement

4.       Colorado Interfaith Power and Light

5.       Colorado Renewable Energy Society

6.       Community for Sustainable Energy

7.       Denver Catholic Network

8.       Eco-Justice Ministries

9.       Empower Our Future

10.   EnergyShouldBe.Org

11.   Fort Collins Sustainability Group

12.   Fossil Fuel Free Denver

13.   Our Children’s Trust Colorado

14.   Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center

15.   San Luis Valley Ecosystem Council

16.   Sustainable Revolution Longmont

17.   Transition Fort Collins

For further information, please contact Kevin Cross of the Fort Collins Sustainability Group at info@fccan.org or 970-419-8944.