Category Archives: Boulder

URGENT: SAVE BOULDER’S BID FOR A MUNICIPAL UTILITY

This week could prove critical in determining Boulder’s energy future, and CEA needs your support.

Xcel Energy has launched a bid to stop Boulder’s 7-year effort toward municipalization in its tracks. One April 17th, the Boulder City Council considers two proposals from Xcel designed to dissuade us from our quest to control our own energy destiny.

Two days later, on April 19th, the Public Utilities Commission is holding an equally critical hearing on a motion to dismiss Boulder’s municipalization case outright.

We need your help to keep municipalization alive!

This is a critical moment for the future of independent municipal utilities in Colorado, so we ask not just Boulder residents but all Coloradans to step up to the plate.

Email the PUC at dora_PUC_complaints@state.co.us​​ with your support for Boulder’s constitutional right to form a municipal utility. A few things to mention:

  • Communities should have a right to determine their energy future and should not be constrained by Xcel’s thinking and corporate constraints
  • Under the law of Colorado, Boulder has a constitutional right to form a municipal utility, and it is up to the Commission to protect that right, and make sure it means more than words in a statute book
  • At this defining moment in the history of our planet, we need more options than a profit-driven monopoly that remains dependent on fossil fuels for more than 70% of its power generation.

We also ask our supporters to contact the City Council at council@bouldercolorado.gov and tell them to stay the course! We encourage you to remind them that:

  • Boulder Energy Future has worked for seven years to build a realistic, reasonable alternative to continued partnership with Xcel.
  • Boulder voters have weighed in on this issue not once but several times. In ballot measures in 2011, 2013, and 2014 Boulder’s residents asserted their demand to control their own energy future.
  • The two deals proposed by Xcel are both unacceptable, and do not reflect the best interests or desires of the rate-payers of Boulder.

Most importantly, there is a Stay the Course Rally outside the Municipal Building at 1777 Broadway, Boulder CO 80302 from 5:00-6:00 pm before the City Council hearing on Monday April 17th. Please come and show your support for Boulder’s Energy Future and the municipalization effort. Wear green and bring signs or posters. A couple ideas for signs and poster slogans:

  • “STAY THE COURSE!”
  • “Just Say NO (To Xcel)!”
  • “Don’t Give Away Our Energy Future!”

Finally, we ask all of our supporters to be polite and respectful when communicating with the PUC and the City Council. We cannot overstate the importance of addressing our officials in a way that is clear and concise, and also gracious and polite.

Thank you for your support. Together we will make a difference!

People’s Climate March on Denver: Get Involved Today

Tell our elected officials that the environment matters! April 29th, 2017 is the 100th day of President Donald Trump’s administration.  Clean Energy Action is marking the day by joining with the People’s Climate of Colorado, 350 Colorado, and countless other groups in a huge demonstration to highlight our recognition that climate change is real, that it impacts all of us, and that we are committed to solving it.

The PCM in Denver, along with other sister city marches, is happening simultaneously to the People’s Climate March in Washington. Like the Women’s March, the PCM will be a national show of resistance, resolve, and unity.

There are many ways to show your support for our planet:

  • Planning to attend? RSVP on Facebook, sign up on Action Network,  and tell your friends and family.
  • Want to get more involved? Take this survey in order to register to be trained as an PCM Marshal, or check out this training meeting in Denver, and help us make sure the event is a great success!
  • The Climate March also needs financial support. Make a donation or purchase one of these awesome T-shirts, and put your dollars to work in defense of our environment.
  • You can also be a #climatehero and help spread the word on Facebook and twitter:  #peoplesclimatemarch #denverclimatemarch

Hope to see you there!

Mon. 6/27: A Community Discussion About Our Energy Future with Alice Jackson, Xcel VP for Rates and Regulatory Affairs

Please join Clean Energy Action and Empower Our Future for:

A Community Discussion About Our Energy Future with

Alice Jackson, Xcel VP for Rates and Regulatory Affairs

Monday, June 27th
7 pm
First Presbyterian Church
1820 15th St, Boulder 
(Corner of Canyon and 15th)
This will be an excellent opportunity to hear Xcel’s top PUC witness discuss all that is going on at Xcel and to share with her the concerns of the Boulder community about climate change, decarbonizing our electricity, supporting competition in the solar industry and our vision for a livable future.

A Survey of Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Colorado Senate Committee Kills Bill that Would Strengthen Climate Plan

A bill to require Colorado’s Climate Plans to include specific, measureable goals, deadlines, and annual reports on the state’s progress in reducing emissions was killed in the Senate Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Energy Committee last month.

While state law requires Governor Hickenlooper to publish a “Climate Action Plan” annually, his 2015 Climate Plan took “action” out of both the plan’s title and its contents. Proposing no new initiatives, the plan is a step backward for emissions goals, climate initiatives, and renewable energy in Colorado.

With Colorado’s leaders dodging responsibility for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, Clean Energy Action decided to take a closer look at these emissions and exactly how they’re generated.

Where do GHGs come from?

It is widely known that activities like burning coal to produce energy and burning gasoline to power cars release carbon emissions into the atmosphere. But to be effective at fighting climate change, both the relative and total impacts of all industries must be considered. For example, natural gas was once touted as a “bridge fuel” which could help the United Statestransition to a renewable energy future, but now many question whether this would generate less harmful emissions.

While the focus of most environmental groups is on reducing combustion of fossil fuels (for good reason—it makes up almost 85% of emissions), industries like agriculture and manufacturing also have significant impacts. In order to uphold the climate agreement adopted at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), plans to mitigate climate change must prioritize the most impactful GHG sources but also make inroads into limiting carbon emissions from diverse sources.

GHG inventories, which estimate the amount of emissions generated by various GHG sources in a region, have been performed at the national level as well as in some states and cities to inform climate initiatives and set a baseline for measuring changes in emissions levels.

Although every region has unique emissions which reflect the prevalence of different GHG sources, here we look at inventories done in the City of Boulder and the State of Colorado in addition to the entire United States. The Boulder and Colorado emissions generally reflect national trends but vary slightly based on local economic activity. For example, Boulder has no contributions from industrial complexes because they are simply not present in the city. Natural gas mining and distribution systems contribute a large fraction of Colorado’s emissions because Colorado is one of the major natural gas-producing states in the country.

At the national level, the primary GHG sources are:

  • The combustion of fossil fuels for the generation of power and heat and combustion of fuel for transportation. Together these make up almost 85% of U.S. GHG emissions and additional GHG emissions occur during the extraction, production, and transportation of fossil fuels. Currently, inventories predict that these contribute somewhere between 3%-10% of total emissions but the scientific community has raised concerns that actual emission rates from these activities are much higher.
  • The agricultural industry. Agriculture produces about 7.5% of national GHG emissions, mostly through the release of nitrous oxide from fertilizers and methane generated by enteric fermentation in cattle.
  • Industrial complexes. Non-energy-related industrial activities like processing raw materials to make iron, steel, and cement generate over 6% of U.S. pollutants.
  • Waste management. A small percent of GHGs are released during transportation, combustion, and decay of waste materials.

Greenhouse gas inventories.How can surveys be improved?

  • Better reporting: The system of reporting responsibility for GHG emissions by adding up the emissions of the sources in a region has been criticized because it does not account for the impact of outsourced industrial activities. Many argue that consumption-based inventories which follow the purchases made by consumers to calculate the total carbon footprint of a population are more accurate tools for determining the effectiveness of climate mitigation policies and responsibility for GHG emissions than production-based accounting. For example, if you buy a product that was manufactured in China in a factory powered by burning coal and then shipped to the United States, current GHG inventories would show that China, not the United States, was responsible for the emissions associated with the manufacturing of your product. However, a consumption-based inventory would attribute all of the emissions associated with the production and transportation of the item to the region of the consumer that purchased it.
  • More frequent inventories: The data used in the most recent U.S. GHG survey was collected in 2013 and inventories at the state and local levels were performed even less recently. Energy markets have shifted drastically in the last few years, so these inventories are already obsolete. For example, natural gas production has gone up significantly compared to coal production since the data was collected and thus emissions due to natural gas are almost certainly underrepresented in this report.
  • Better measurements: Currently, the quantities of raw materials consumed in a region are reported by local companies and multiplied by combustion efficiencies published by the EPA to determine the total emissions of the region. This top-down method of calculating emissions from numbers reported by individual companies has several significant sources of error including reporting errors and deficits, inaccurate combustion efficiencies, and inability to calculate emissions generated during the extraction and transportation of fossil fuels. The most accurate means of quantifying emissions is to directly measure the pollutants at a site. This ground-up approach is currently too expensive to implement on a large scale but may soon be feasible.

Moving forward

While the UNFCCC requires that countries report their GHG emissions annually, it allows them to report data that is two years old which can lead to outdated emissions data at the national level. In the United States, there is no federal legislation requiring states to perform GHG inventories so little or no information is available on the emissions in many states. For example, Colorado’s most recent GHG inventory was performed to fulfill an executive order by Governor Ritter in 2013 but it used data from 2010 which is now decidedly outdated. Legislation requiring GHG inventories to be performed regularly at both state and national levels would help environmental advocates understand the importance of various GHG sources.

While ground-up measurements and consumption-based reporting are currently expensive and infeasible, they remain the gold standard for assessing emissions. We should continue to work toward developing the technology and global cooperation required to implement them.

Although current GHG inventories aren’t perfect, they provide valuable insights into the relative importance of various GHG emitters at the local, state and national level. They provide information that should guide environmental initiatives to maximize their impact.

The 2016 Community Energy Fair Was a Huge Success

Thank You!

Thank you to everyone who attended and participated in Clean Energy Action’s second annual Community Energy Fair! This year’s Fair was a huge success, drawing hundreds of people and raising thousands of dollars to support clean energy.

CEA Energy Fair

Participants enjoyed a prestigious speaker lineup, cookies baked in a solar oven, electric vehicles on display, opportunities to take action for a wide range of causes, and more.

** 2016 SPEAKER LINEUP **

8:30 AM Christina Gosnell- “Climate Ransom”
Clean energy advocate, coal cost and supply research analyst

9:00 AM Martin Ogle- “Fire and Photosynthesis; Our Energy Future” 

Founder, Entrepreneurial Earth LLC;  Chief Naturalist, No. VA Regional Park Authority, 1985-2012;  long-time energy educator

9:30 AM Russell Mendell- “Yes for Health and Safety Over Fracking – CO Ballot Initiatives 75 and 78”

Clean energy advocate and activist working with Coloradans Against Fracking, Earth Guardians and other organizations

10:00 AM Dr. James White- “Climate Change: What’s happening now, and what’s to come”

Professor of Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies, Director of Institute of Arctic & Alpine Research (INSTAAR) at the University of Colorado at Boulder
11:00 AM Heather Bailey- “Boulder’s Energy Future”
Executive Director of Energy Strategy and Electric Utility Development for the city of Boulder

11:30 AM Hunter Lovins- “Triumph of the Sun Revisited: It’s Over, Renewables Win” 

President and Founder of CO non-profit Natural Capitalism Solutions (NCS), author and sustainable development champion, consultant with governments, communities, companies worldwide. Time Magazine, Millennium Hero for the Planet.

12:30 PM Ken Regelson-“100% Renewables-Let’s Go!”

Founder of EnergyShouldBe.org, COSEIA Sunny award recipient, energy policy analyst, electrical engineer

1:30 Dr. Kevin Trenberth- “Our planet is running a fever: global warming is happening”

Distinguished Senior Scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), prominent in all aspects of climate variability and climate change research including focuses on changes in global energy and water cycles

2:30 Luke Straka- “Climate, Health, and the Latino Community”

Research and Development Coordinator for Colorado Latino Leadership, Advocacy and Research Organization (CLLARO)