Category Archives: Uncategorized

Support CEA at upcoming PUC Hearing!

WEDNESDAY November 6th: PUC Public Hearing 
1560 Broadway, Suite 230, Denver CO 4:00-6:00 PM

Please come to tell the PUC not to let Xcel fund fossil fuel investments with our state’s money! We would love to have you at one of the trainings below . . . 

BOULDER
October 21st 2019, 6:00 PM
Meadows Branch Library
4800 Baseline Ste C112 Boulder, CO 80303

ARVADA
October 30th 2019, 6:00 PM
Standley Lake Library
8485 Kipling Street C112 Arvada, CO 80005

. . . but even if you can’t make either training, please join us at the hearing and help hold polluters accountable for their decisions!

In our regulated monopoly system, we do not get to decide what kind of energy we purchase to feed our homes and businesses. Xcel Energy, the supplier for the Denver-Boulder metro area, has invested heavily in coal, opening its largest and most expensive coal facility in 2010, long after the effects of climate change were well understood. We protested their decision then, and we do not want to see more of our residents’ dollars go to pay off fossil fuel assets that were economically and environmentally unsound. 

JOIN US NOVEMBER 6TH 4:00-6:00 PM AND URGE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMISSION NOT TO FUND XCEL’S MISTAKES!

“Stop Fracking Our Future!” 9/29 Broomfield

           Clean Energy Action is thrilled to join 350 Colorado for:                “Stop Fracking Our Future!”

When: Sunday, Sept. 29, 4-7pm

Where: Anthem Community Park at Siena Reservoir (15663 Sheridan Pkwy, Broomfield, CO 80020)

What to bring: Water bottle, a drought-resistant native, edible or pollinator plant, bush or fruit/nut tree, planting tools, an old pair of children’s shoes (for an art project showing the # of children impacted by fracking), and lots of friends and family! (Please carpool or take public transit if possible.)

RSVP here! And please spread the word on Facebook here! Want to volunteer? Email volunteer@350colorado.org

Neighborhood fracking is poisoning Colorado communities and accelerating the climate crisis. From methane leaks speeding up climate change to devastating health impacts on frontline communities and the entire region’s F-grade air quality – it is time we put an end to fracking in Colorado. 

Please join us to show your support! This will be an exciting action culminating the Climate Strike Action Week, with a range of activities for everyone! 

***Live Music by Tierro Band Trio with Bridget Law (of Elephant Revival)***

***Face painting and other activities for kids***

***Food & Drinks***

***Build a community garden to absorb carbon and create a positive alternative vision for our future***

***Sign petitions calling for no new fossil fuel infrastructure, including stopping permits for fracking, and a rapid transition to 100% renewable energy***

***Help educate and activate community members about the dangers of fracking and an alternative renewable energy future***

Please also join us for another Climate Strike Action Week frack event: Sept. 25, 8:30 Youth Press Conference, Rally & COGCC hearing. All events happening Sept. 20-29 can be found at www.ClimateStrikeActionWeek.co

Thanks and see you there!

Our new short film: Embracing Sustainable Energy in Rural Communities

Tri-State Generation & Transmission, the regional power provider for rural electric co-operatives across several western states, has been facing increased scrutiny recently about its resistance to allowing more sustainable local power generation. This pressure is compounded by the continued decline of coal markets and higher costs of coal generation.

Clean Energy Action has urged Tri-state to be more responsive to local requests and more supportive of local clean energy. Check out this new video by Jared Nast for more information about Tri-State and how you can support clean rural power. Share with your friends!

Read the report mentioned in Jared’ piece for more details. 

 

 

Community Choice Aggregation: A Legislative Path to Energy Freedom

Community Choice Aggregation is an energy freedom program that permits a community to directly access the competitive market to procure power from the energy supplier they choose. This is in contrast to much of Colorado’s current situation in which a monopoly utility (in Boulder this is Xcel) is granted exclusive rights as a region’s energy supplier by the state. The benefits of a free energy market are many; competitive markets can lead to lower rates, the ability to choose sustainably generated power, and the ability to invest in local solutions which create jobs and keeps money in the local economy. CEA endorses policies for energy freedom, and fortunately, local legislators and non-profits like Energy Freedom Colorado are working to make a path to energy freedom for Colorado.

To give you a better understanding of how it works, let’s begin with the power grid. The three main components of a power grid are energy generation, transmission (of electricity over long distances from power plants to local substations), and distribution (of electricity from a substation to the consumer). Community choice aggregation (CCA) is a cooperation between municipal utilities and investor-owned utilities (IOU) in which the municipal CCA purchases power independently, but the transmission, distribution, and customer interface are maintained by the local IOU as shown below. CCAs served about 3.3 million people in 2016 and are growing rapidly in the eight states where they have been legalized, allowing municipalities in these states to choose their power sources in a way that reflects the values of their community, which include factors like cost, environmental impact, and supporting local energy businesses.

Graphic from National Renewable Energy Labs website

To implement CCA in Colorado, our legislature would need to enact CCA legislation, and the Public Utility Commission (PUC) would need to adopt corresponding rules and regulations. Several structural aspects of Colorado’s electricity grid could make this process more complicated than it has been for other states. For example, most states with CCA had already restructured their IOU to make separate companies for power generation and delivery, which simplifies the process of transitioning to municipally controlled power generation. Further, Colorado is not part of a Regional Transmission Organization (RTO), which is an independent, non-profit operator of a large, integrated transmission grid. Instead, each region’s transmission lines are controlled by the local utility, which complicates the task of transporting power from the generation site across a number of independently owned transmission systems to the municipality. Despite the challenges, we can overcome these obstacles and make the change. If you would like to learn more or help move Colorado forward, here are some links for you:

For general background information:
NREL: https://www.nrel.gov/state-local-tribal/blog/posts/community-choice-aggregation-cca-helping-communities-reach-renewable-energy-goals.html
LEAN: http://leanenergyus.org/cca-by-state/
EPA: https://www.epa.gov/greenpower/community-choice-aggregation

For Colorado specific information and/or to get involved in Colorado’s policy efforts:
EFC: http://energyfreedomco.org/