Tag Archives: boulder muni

Senator Stephen Fenberg on Local Power vs. Corporate Power

In an interview last month with John Farrell at the Institute for Local Self Reliance, Colorado Senator Stephen Fenberg voiced his opinions on the importance of local power in terms of demanding energy from cleaner sources.  He spoke about the long standing debate of switching to more clean energy sources in an economically feasible manner. He states that technology will allow cheap clean energy, but the barrier that is holding back this transfer from coal power to renewables is orchestrated politically and legally by the utilities.steve His argument is not inherently against investor-owned utilities, it is about the role our utilities play in maintaining and promoting the regulatory barriers that exist today and prevent us from pursuing renewable energy to its fullest extent. Fenberg enforces the idea that  “utilities do have an immense amount of power and authority and financial resources behind them”, which makes it difficult for communities to hold a threat to utilities.

What’s really exciting now though, is that technologies are available and are cheap enough to move us to a clean energy future. At this point it’s about giving communities the opportunity and power to control their energy future. Senator Fenberg describes how “there shouldn’t be these regulatory barriers to keeping individuals, as well as communities, from being able to use these technologies and new opportunities to have more control over their energy future.”

It is now regulation, not technology, that stands between Boulder and its objectives. That is why municipalization is necessary for Boulder to meet its renewable energy goals. The process is not quick or simple, but because of the challenges Fenberg discusses, Boulder needs to take control of its energy future before the City can pursue the many exciting options and technologies that will take Boulder to its renewable energy future.

Check out the full interview here for more information about Senator Fenberg’s thoughts on local power.

Public Banking: Supporting community Resiliency & Renewable Energy

An Evening with Gwen Hallsmith
Executive Director of the Public Banking Institute

January 29th
6:30 – 7 pm – Refreshments
7 – 8:45 pm – Discussion
Impact Hub, Boulder
1877 Broadway St.
RSVP Here

Gwen Hallsmith
Gwen Hallsmith, the Executive Director of the Public Banking Institute will present on how public banking could play a role in financing a municipal electric utility and how Boulder can use public banking to enhance community wealth, resiliency, entrepreneurial participation and economic vitality. She will discuss the main advantage of public banking: lower-cost financing which enables states, counties and cities to better fund small business, infrastructure and projects such as affordable housing, libraries, farm-to-table agriculture, renewable energy, energy efficiency and public transportation. Each of these projects creates good local jobs. In these ways, public banks enable cities, counties, and states to better finance public priorities without relying on Wall Street or paying the high interest rates that pad big bank profits.

This presentation is part of Clean Energy Action’s Global Warming Solutions Speaker Series. Audience participation will be invited during discussion and Q&A. No RSVP required.

More About Gwen

Gwen most recently made national headlines with her work in Vermont to ask Town Meetings to consider public banking. On March 4th, 18 cities and towns in Vermont voted to endorse a resolution directing the state legislators to create a State Bank for Vermont. Thanks to the media expertise of William Boardman and Matt Stannard, the national media has picked up on the story, and there have been now over 20 radio interviews, print stories, and starting this week we’ll be on syndicated television with the story as well… Gwen has an interview with GritTV on Tuesday, and we understand that even bigger shows are working on the story – stay tuned.

Gwen is the author of several books on sustainable communities and economic reform, including her most recent book with Bernard Lietaer called Creating Wealth: Growing Local Communities with Local Currencies. She has been an advocate for economic reform for over 25 years, and implemented new currency projects on the local level in her recent position as the Director of Planning and Community Development for the City of Montpelier. Her work spans the globe – she has worked in all the major world regions at this point, and with cities, towns, regions, provinces, and states in the United States and Canada.

Her vision for the Public Banking Institute expands our horizons to include many other aspects of a public monetary system, everything from strengthening the possibilities for local investment that the new SEC regulations allow to fostering and supporting complementary currencies for local and regional means of exchange. Her deep commitment to local action matches our vision for the Institute as a source of technical assistance, training, and research for all the state, regional, and local initiatives underway to set up public banks and other currency and investment initiatives.

Legal Battle for Municipalization

An Evening With Tom Carr, Boulder City Attorney

Wednesday, October 15th, 7:00 pm
George Reynolds Branch Library
3595 Table Mesa Dr, Boulder, 80305

Boulder City Attorney, Tom Carr
photo courtesy of www.bouldercolorado.gov

Please join the Members of Empower Our Future for a conversation about the legal process for municipalization. This should be an informative night. Light refreshments will be served at 6:30 pm. We hope to see you there.

Tom Carr is the City Attorney and primary legal advisor to the City Council and City Manager. He manages the City Attorney’s Office staff and outside counsel arrangements and is responsible for prosecuting violations of city ordinances.

Tom provides the city with a broad range of legal services including litigation, contract and ordinance drafting, transactional work and administrative hearings. Presently his focus is on environmental, social, and regional growth issues.