Tag Archives: citizens climate lobby

Citizen Power Training with special guest Great March for Climate Action

 Take action to fix the deficient energy market.

Tuesday June 17th, 6:00 – 8:00 pm
Central Presbyterian Church
1660 Sherman St., Denver, CO 80203

Register Here

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How do community members change energy policies in our state? What can we learn from the Great March for Climate Action? How can we use our solidarity to move state legislators in the fight for sustainability?

Clean Energy Action is bringing together Denver community members, students and the Great March for Climate Change Action to use our momentum for climate action to demand energy policy improvements from our state legislators. This two-hour training will teach attendees the steps to setting up meetings with their state legislators, give participants the opportunity to organize groups for future visits, and allow participants to sign up for legislative visits on the spot.

Join fellow community members, Clean Energy Action and guest speakers from the Great March for Climate Action in an evening of action, empowerment, and community. Learn how to speak truth to power and demand changes to our deficient energy market.

Colorado_State_Capitol_Building_Denver_Colorado

Training

This evening of action will feature the national activists from the Great March for Climate Action on their last day in Denver. They will discuss the power of community activism for climate action, and they will share their goals as they march across the country demanding action for the climate and sustainability.

Once we are inspired, we will move into an educational component about where we fit in the legislative process as community members. Next, we will practice the most valuable component of creating change: sharing our stories. After we have established what makes us powerful as citizens, we will divide into groups based on districts and create a script for meetings with our legislators. Finally, we will end with the opportunity to sign up to meet with legislators and we’ll write letters to the editor of the Denver Post or other news source about our demands for improvements to our energy economy.

Don’t miss this opportunity to stand in solidarity as community members, call on your legislators to create policy improvements to an energy market that is overdue for change, and be inspired by activists that are traversing the country to demand solutions for our climate and create sustainability.

Logistics

Food will be provided at the beginning of the training. The space is wheelchair accessible. For other ability and language needs, please contact Katie Raitz at (719)640-5803 or katie.raitz@gmail.com Gender-neutral restrooms. We are unable to provide childcare for this event. Non-voting age youth are welcome to attend.

Sign up on the Eventbrite page, and include your zip code so that we can place you in a group with similar constituents. You don’t need to bring a ticket, we’ll have your name at registration. The event will be in the basement of the Church, and there will be signs. Metered parking can be found around the church and there is a lot across the street. The Church is accessible via RTD public transportation.

Exploring a Carbon Price for Colorado

In May of 2013 I gave a talk at Clean Energy Action’s Global Warming Solutions Speaker Series in Boulder, on how we might structure a carbon pricing scheme in Colorado. You can also download a PDF of the slides and watch an edited version of that presentation via YouTube:

The short policy overview:

  • We should begin levying a modest carbon tax, in the range of $5 to $25/ton of CO2e.
  • The tax must be applied to the fossil fuels used in electricity generation (coal and natural gas). Ideally it should also be applied to gasoline, diesel, natural gas used outside the power sector, and fugitive methane emissions from the oil and gas industry, but those are less important for the moment.
  • New electricity generation resources must be allowed to compete economically with the operation of existing carbon-intensive facilities, and fuel costs must not be blindly passed through to consumers without either rigorous regulatory oversight, or utilities sharing fuel price risk.
  • Carbon tax revenues should be spent on emissions mitigation, providing reliable, low-cost financing for energy efficiency measures and a standard-offer contract with modest performance-based returns for new renewable generation.
  • Over time the carbon price should be increased and applied uniformly across all segments of the economy, with the eventual integration of  consumption based emissions footprinting for imported goods.

But wait… I can hear you saying, I thought James Hansen and others  were rallying support for a revenue neutral carbon tax proposal?  Even the arch-conservative American Enterprise Institute was looking into it, weren’t they?

A carbon price alone is not enough to get the job done — there are other pieces of our energy markets that also have to be fixed to get us to carbon zero.

Continue reading Exploring a Carbon Price for Colorado